Opening of Southport’s specialist Domestic and Family Violence Court

Businesswoman in front of a bookcase

On 19 October 2017, the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath officially opened Southport’s permanent specialist Domestic and Family Violence Court.  The renovations reflect the caseload of Southport’s specialist DFV court which has dealt with more than 12,000 matter since the trial began in September 2015.

The renovations include:

  1. A dedicated registry counter for enquiries and filing DFV court applications;
  2. Secure entry for courtrooms
  3. Video conferencing facilities for female victims too fearful to attend court in person and witnesses.
  4. Quiet room for distressed women;
  5. Secure children’s play area,
  6. Meeting room facilities for men and their legal and support services, and
  7. Sound-proofed meeting rooms.

The $2.69 million renovation to upgrade Southport courthouse is in addition to the $69.5 million previously allocated to domestic and family violence courts in the 2017-18 State Budget.

The opening follows the appointment of two specialist Magistrates for the Southport DFV Court – Clare Kelly and Louise Shepherd.

Do you require legal advice or representation regarding a domestic violence matter? Call Gatenby Criminal Law now on (07) 5580 0120 or send us a message online.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice, you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Proposed Bill to prohibit DV Respondents from holding explosives licence

Following on from the Queensland Government’s Not Now Not Ever policy, the Land, Explosives and Other Legislation Amendment Bill has been introduced into parliament.  The aim of the proposed legislation is to prohibit those with Domestic and Family Violence protection orders against them from holding an explosives licence.

Currently Queensland is the largest user of explosives in Australia, predominately in the mining industry, using approximately one third of the three million tonnes consumed annually.

In Queensland, ‘explosives’ is defined in Schedule 2 of the Explosives Act and includes:

  1. ammunition,
  2. blasting explosives,
  3. distress signals,
  4. flares,
  5. fireworks,
  6. propellants; and
  7. pyrotechnics.

The Bill will amend the Explosives Act 1999 to prohibit a person who is the subject of a domestic violence order from obtaining an explosives licence, or alternatively, if they are in possession of a licence the licence will be immediately suspended.

It has always been the case that a Respondent to a DV order was unable to possess a firearm, however the proposed legislation will have far reaching consequences, particularly given the wide definition of ‘explosives’ under the act.

Employees who are required to hold an explosives licence to either purchase, possess, use, transport and store explosives will be unable to maintain their employment.  With DV orders now generally in operation for five years there will be some real concern if this legislation is to pass.

Process

The chief inspector may decide to give a security clearance to the applicant only if satisfied the applicant is a suitable person to hold the security clearance. In making the determination the chief inspector is to consider the applicants criminal history and relevantly whether the applicant has, at any time, been named as the respondent in a  domestic violence order or police  protection notice; and whether release conditions have, at any  time, been imposed on the applicant under the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act 2012, section 125;

In particular the Applicant will be deemed not to be a suitable person to hold the security clearance if either:

  1. the applicant is named as the respondent in a  domestic violence order, or police protection notice, that is in force; or
  2. release conditions have been imposed on the applicant under the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act 2012, section 125 and the release conditions are in force.

For assistance with Domestic Violence legislation, Gatenby Criminal Lawyers are able to assist.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

DV Applications: How To Apply For A Domestic Violence Order

Domestic violence bailIf you are in a domestic relationship and the subject of domestic violence you may be eligible to complete a DV application for a Domestic Violence Protection Order.  The person applying for the Order is called the Applicant.  The person being served with the application is the Respondent.

The process is relatively straightforward.  Domestic Violence Legislation is aimed at protection rather than punishment. The process has been simplified to ensure that DV applications can proceed in the best interests of the parties.  The clear intention of the legislation is to act protectively.

You need to attend the Registry of your nearest Magistrates Court and obtain an Application for a Domestic Violence Protection Order.

A DV Application can also be downloaded online.

Completing the DV Application.

You should complete the DV Application providing as much detail as you can to ensure that the Magistrate understands your situation.

You can apply for an urgent Temporary Protection Order. The Court registry staff can assist you with this. An urgent Temporary Protection Order (TPO) is an Order that is made in the absence of the Respondent, or person from whom you are seeking protection. If a Magistrate decides that it is necessary and desirable they can make an Order protecting you from the Respondent on a temporary basis, until the Respondent is served and appears in Court.

You do not need to serve the DV Application on the Respondent, the Police will look after this for you.

MENTION

Generally, unless you have an urgent Temporary Protection Order Application, the Registry will list your matter for a “Mention” three to four weeks after your DV Application is lodged. This is not a Hearing date and often the matter will not be finalised.

This is simply a date where the Magistrate is advised what is happening with the application. In some instances the Respondent will not have been served and the matter will need to be adjourned for another Mention.

Where the Respondent has been served and simply does not attend Court, the matter may proceed to finalisation. A Magistrate may grant a final Order where there has been no appearance by the Respondent.

If the Respondent has been served and consents to the making of an Order, the Magistrate may grant the final Order and the matter will be at an end.

If, however, the Respondent does not consent to the making of the Order the matter maybe listed for a Hearing.

HEARING

The Hearing of a Domestic Violence Application is conducted before a Magistrate.  They will determine:

  1. whether a domestic relationship exists;
  2. whether an act of domestic violence has occurred; and
  3. whether it is necessary and desirable for a Protection Order to be made.

At the Hearing your evidence may be by way of Affidavit or alternatively you may be required to give evidence by sitting in the witness box.

If the Respondent does not agree with what you say, they have an opportunity to cross-examine you either in person or through their legal representative.

The Respondent may also give evidence by way of an Affidavit or in person, in the witness box. You are also entitled to cross-examine the Respondent if you do not agree with what they say.

An Applicant has the opportunity to have the Police Prosecutor appear on their behalf or alternatively they can have a private Domestic Violence Lawyer or a Legal Aid Solicitor appear.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Bail (Domestic Violence) and Another Act Amendment Bill 2017

Domestic violence bailOn Valentines Day 2017, the Opposition Leader, Tim Nicholls introduced the Bail (Domestic Violence) and Another Act Amendment Bill 2017 into the Queensland Parliament. The Bill will see a massive change to domestic violence bail laws.

The proposed Bill was prompted by the tragic death of Ms Terresa Bradford, who was killed by her estranged husband two weeks earlier.  Sadly the death was not uncommon with eighteen Queensland women dying in DV related incidents in 2016.

Policy Objectives

The Bill has five policy objectives:

  1. Reverse the presumption of bail for an accused charged with a relevant domestic violence offence;
  2. Create a special bail condition for GPS trackers for people charged with a relevant domestic violence offence;
  3. Create a mandatory reporting system to alert an alleged victim of domestic violence when the accused:
    • applies for bail;
    • is released on bail; or
    • receives a variation to a bail condition.
  4. Create a mandatory reporting system when a prisoner (whether or not convicted of domestic violence):
    • applies for parole; and
    • receives parole
  5. A process to stay grants of bail for three (3) days, while bail is appealed by police.

Presumption against domestic violence bail

Where a person is held in custody for an offence that they are yet to be convicted of,  the Court would usually grant bail, unless the police can demonstrate that the person is an unacceptable risk.  This onus is shifted in the Bail Act where the person:

  1. is already on bail and is alleged to have committed an indictable offence;
  2. is charged with an offence that carries mandatory life imprisonment;
  3. is charged with an offence that carries an indefinite sentence;
  4. is alleged to have breached the Bail Act
  5. is charged with contravening a control or public safety order contrary to the Criminal Organisation Act;
  6. is charged with an offence of making threats with a circumstance of aggravation;
  7. if the person has at any time been a participant in a criminal organisation;

The proposal is that the Court would have to refuse bail to an accused where they were charged with a ‘relevant domestic violence offence”.  That is, the legislation will reverse the onus in relation to relevant domestic violence offences and an accused person will need to demonstrate why they should be granted bail.  The definitions provision in section 6 of the bail act will be amended to define a relevant domestic violence offence as:

  1. Choking, suffocation or strangulation in a domestic setting
  2. Deprivation of Liberty
  3. Stalking
  4. Arson
  5. A serious violent offence (SVO) as defined in the Penalties and Sentences Act, if the offence is also a Domestic Violence offence.

GPS Tracker

In our earlier blog post ‘Electronic Tracking for alleged Queensland DVO Offenders‘, we discussed GPS Trackers.

Under the proposed legislation a tracking device is:

an electronic device capable of being worn, and not removed, by a person, for the purpose of the Queensland Police Service finding or monitoring the geographical location of the person.

The Bill requires a court or police officer authorised to grant bail to consider requiring an accused person to wear a tracking device while the person is released on bail.

The Bill also requires that the court consider imposing a special condition that prohibits the accused from approaching within a stated distance of a place regularly frequented by the complainant for the offence such as their place of residence or workplace.

Domestic Violence Bail Alert

Where a person charged with a relevant domestic violence offence (see above) makes an application for bail or an application to vary their bail, the prosecutor must give the aggrieved notice of the application within 24 hours of the application being made.

If bail is granted the Court or Police must give notice to the aggrieved of the date that the person is released and the date that the person is next required to appear at Court.

This information is to be provided immediately to the ‘person at risk’.

Parole Alert for victims of Domestic Violence

The Corrective Services Act 2006 is also amended by the Bill to enable an ‘eligible person’ to receive information about a prisoner.  An eligible person can be any person who satisfies the Chief Executive that they have been the victim of Domestic Violence, perpetrated by the prisoner.  It is not a requirement that the prisoner is in custody for an offence against the eligible person.

The chief executive must provide the person with:

  1. the prisoners eligibility dates for discharge or release;
  2. the prisoners date of discharge or release;
  3. the death or escape of the prisoner; or
  4. any particular circumstance that could reasonably be expected to endanger the physical safety of the person.

Review of Domestic Violence Bail Decisions

A prosecutor can appeal the decision to grant bail to a person charged with a relevant domestic violence offence.  In those circumstances the accused person can be held in custody until 4:00pm, 3 business days after the decision is made.  So that a person granted bail at 10:00am on a Friday morning could be held in custody until 4:00pm the following Wednesday.

If the person has been released prior to the appeal by the prosecutor, the reviewing Court may give effect to the stay, by issuing a warrant of apprehension.

The prosecution has always had the power to appeal the decision of a court to grant bail.  The current amendment is to permit the police to hold the person in custody for up to three business days.  This provision is said to mirror section 40 of the New South Wales Bail Act.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Recording Private Conversations – Is it lawful?

recording private conversationsThe Moreton Bay Council recently announced that they have rolled out 330 CCTV cameras that have the capacity to record private conversations.

In 2013 the then Queensland Transport Minister sought to introduce audio recording in taxi cabs. This raises the question, “Is it ok to record other peoples conversations?”

Invasion of Privacy Act

Section 43 of the Invasion of Privacy Act provides a maximum penalty of two years imprisonment where the person uses a listening device to overhear, record, monitor or listen to a private conversation.  The legislation clearly intends that private conversations will be kept private.  There are a number of exceptions such as the unintentional hearing of a private conversation by means of a telephone.

Importantly, where the person using the listening device is a party to the private conversation the conduct can be lawful.  In some situations parties have been known to record the conversation without advising the other party.

In relation to the Council there can be no dispute that they are not a party to the conversation. Accordingly many are suggesting that the conduct is unlawful.

Communicating private conversations

The Council has suggested that they will provide the audio to the police in relevant situations.  This is again covered by the Invasion of Privacy Act.  Section 44 provides a maximum of two years imprisonment where a person communicates a private conversation…  The phone conversation would also likely be inadmissible pursuant to section 46 of the Act.

Reasonable expectation

The turning point for the council may be the issue of whether there is a reasonable expectation that the words are overheard or recorded.  The act provides the following definition of ‘private conversation’.

Any words spoken by one person to another person in circumstances that indicate that those persons desire the words to be heard or listened to only by themselves or that indicate that either of those persons desires the words to be heard or listened to only by themselves and by some other person, but does not include words spoken by one person to another person in circumstances in which either of those persons ought reasonably to expect the words may be overheard, recorded, monitored or listened to by some other person, not being a person who has the consent, express or implied, of either of those persons to do so.

If there were clear signs indicating that conversations were being recorded, monitored or listened to, the Council may need to establish that there was no reasonable expectation of privacy.

There are difference rules for organisations and individuals.  We have all had the telemarketers run through their consent spiel.  There are also different rules throughout Australia.  While two people on a telephone in Qld might be acceptable, if one of the parties is interstate the rules can differ.  If you are considering recording a conversation, it would be prudent to seek advice.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

What to consider when contesting a Domestic Violence Application

Domestic Violence

Contesting a Domestic Violence Application under Queensland’s Domestic Violence legislation can be a daunting.  You should carefully consider the Application before you decide how to respond to it.  We provide our tips for challenging a Protection Order.

Does a relevant relationship exist?

Not all relationships are protected by the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act.  For an order to be granted the Applicant must establish that the relationship is:

  • an intimate personal relationship;
  • a family relationship; or
  • an informal care relationship.

If the Applicant can not establish this then the Court can not grant a Protection Order.

Does the application establish that Domestic Violence has occurred?

The Applicant must establish that an act of Domestic Violence has occurred.  Domestic Violence means behaviour towards another person that is abusive, threatening, coercive or controlling of the other person.

If the behaviour does not meet the threshold of Domestic Violence then the Court can not grant a Protection Order.

Does the application set out why it is necessary or desirable for an Order to be made?

If you agree that there was an act of domestic violence and that you are in a relevant relationship, you may still contest the making of a protection order.

The Applicant has to satisfy the Court that the making of a Protection Order is necessary or desirable

Are the conditions sought reasonable?

The Applicant can seek an order with the mandatory conditions, to be of good behaviour and not to commit acts of Domestic Violence.

The Applicant can also seek more restrictive conditions such as no contact direct or indirect.  They may also seek conditions  that require you to leave the family home and not return.

You should very carefully consider the conditions that are being sought and think about whether they are reasonable.  In some instances it may not be practicable to have no contact with the Applicant, for example if there is a need to see mutual children or attend a joint workplace.

In considering whether it is necessary or desirable to make a protection order the court must consider the principles set out in Section 4 Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act 2012 and whether any voluntary intervention has been entered into.

Who else does the order seek to protect?

A domestic violence application can seek to protect:

  1. the aggrieved;
  2. children who usually live with the aggrieved; and
  3. relatives and associates of the aggrieved.

A protection order can restrict contact with not only the Aggrieved but also, children, relatives and other associates.

Will a Lawyer Help?

Our lawyers have a wealth of experience in Domestic Violence matters and can provide you with pragmatic advice.  We can assist you in understanding the conditions that are being sought and appear as advocates.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

 

Domestic & Family Violence Protection Bill 2016

DV LAW SET TO BE STRENGTHENED AND PENALTIES INCREASED.

Domestic Violence Law

Domestic Violence LawOn 16 August 2016, the Minister for Child Safety and Minister for the Protection of Domestic and Family Violence introduced the Domestic and Family Violence and other Legislation Amendment Bill.  When introducing the new Domestic Violence Law the minister noted that during 2016, there had been 9 coronial investigations into the deaths that had occurred in domestic or family relationships in Queensland.

It was said that the purpose of the amendment was to:

  1. Better protect and support victims of Domestic and Family Violence;
  2. Hold perpetrators of Domestic and Family Violence accountable; and
  3. Provide police and the Courts with improved tools to save lives and protect victims.

National Scheme

The Bill enables Queensland to participate in the National Domestic Violence Order Scheme. This scheme has been agreed to by COAG.  One of the Key findings from the Coronial Inquest into Luke Batty’s death was the failure by counsellors, police, courts, medical practitioners and others to share information.  This Bill seeks to enable the sharing of information between key Government and non-government entities.

Currently the Act provides that DVO made anywhere in Australia or New Zealand are recognised and enforceable in Queensland. Such recognition is provided that the Aggrieved manually registers their order with a Magistrate Court in Queensland. This requirement will be done away with.  The proposal is that all jurisdictions will:

  1. Enjoy automatic recognition of interstate orders;
  2. Treat the contravention of and interstate DVO as if it were a Queensland DVO;
  3. Recognise and interstate disqualification such as cancellation of a weapons licence;
  4. Allow for the exchange of information.

Section 169J of the new domestic violence law will override the existing principles and rights under the Criminal Law (Rehabilitation of Offenders) Act 1986. It shall enable information to be shared, notwithstanding the conviction having been spent.

Grounds for Protection Orders

Domestic Violence is defined in Section 8 of the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act. It includes the phrase ‘has committed domestic violence‘.  It is believed that this has created a misapprehension that an act of physical violence must occur before a protection order can be obtained.  The new domestic violence law clarifies that a Court may issue a DV order on the basis that the victim has been threatened or has a fear that the Respondent will commit an act of domestic violence.

Police Protection Notices

The 2012 amendments to the Act introduced Police Protection Notices.  Currently the legislation permits only the alleged victim of Domestic and Family violence to be protected. The Bill expands police powers to include the victim’s children, relatives and other associated people on the Notice.

The new domestic violence law widens the operation of the notice. It expands the conditions which may be included.  Presently, police may only include two (2) conditions. They may do so only if, they are at the same location as the Respondent. The current domestic violence law permits conditions:

  1. that the Respondent not commit acts of Domestic Violence; and
  2. a 24 hour cool down condition.

Police will be able to include extra conditions.  Included is the power to:

  1. remove alleged offenders from the family home until a Court Hearing.
  2. prohibit the respondent from having contact with the victim;
  3. prohibit the respondent from having contact with their children.

Police Protection Orders are enforceable in the same way as Domestic Violence Orders.  Respondents will commit an offence if they breach a condition that the Police Officer has told them about.  The breach will occur, even if they have not been served with a copy of the Order.

The maximum penalty for breaching a Police Protection Order or Release Condition is to be increased to three years imprisonment or 120 penalty units.

Duration of Court Protection Orders.

Currently, under section 97 of the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act, Protection Orders are made for a period of two years. The Bill expands the operational period by setting an expectation that orders will be for a minimum of five  years from the date the PO is made. A Court may only make a PO for a period of less than five (5) years if it is satisfied that there are reasons for doing so.

If the Court does not specify a time frame the PO is held to be in operation for a period of five (5) years from the date the PO is made.

Courts will continue to have to consider what conditions are necessary and desirable to protect the Applicant.

The new domestic violence law will make Queensland objectively the toughest, compared to other jurisdictions, which have the following periods:

  • South Australia – Indefinite Order or until discharged, must wait twelve (12) months before application;
  • New Zealand – Indefinite Order or until discharged;
  • ACT – Two (2) years unless exceptional circumstances require longer period;
  • NSW – Court to determine, or one (1) year if no determination;
  • Western Australia – Court to determine or two (2) years if no determination;
  • Victoria – Court to determine, nil default period;
  • Tasmania – Court to determine, nil default period;
  • Northern Territory – Court to determine, nil default period.

Compliance with ‘Voluntary’ Intervention Order.

The proposed domestic violence law clarifies the weight that a Court is to attribute to an Offenders participating in a voluntary intervention order.  Presently, Courts are required to take into account such participation in deciding whether to make an Order and its duration.  Under the amendment the Court will still be entitled to take into account a Respondents compliance with an Intervention program, but the Court must not refuse to make an Order, or vary an Order merely because the Respondent has complied.

Conversely the Court is required to specifically take into account a Respondents failure or non-compliance while on the Intervention program.

The Bill will remove the word ‘voluntary’ from the definition. This will reflect that Intervention Orders are not voluntary and carry the weight of a Court Order.

Further Information

To read the new Bill click on the attached link Domestic Violence Law 2016 or to discuss how these changes may apply to your situation, contact our lawyers experienced in domestic violence cases today.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Queensland Sentencing Advisory Council

Sentencing law to be assisted by Sentencing Advisory Council

Sentencing LawSentencing law is a complex and often controversial part of the Criminal process.  In considering the competing elements of the sentencing discretion, Magistrates and Judges are often criticised as being too harsh or too lenient.

In March 2016 the Queensland Premier introduced the Penalties and Sentences (Queensland Sentencing Advisory Council) Amendment Bill into the Queensland Parliament. The purpose was to re-establish the Sentencing Advisory Council.  The new council is largely modelled on regime abolished by the former government in 2012.

Purpose

The proposed purpose of the Council is to:

  1. Ensure public confidence in the administration of justice;
  2. Improve the effectiveness of sentencing practices;
  3. Support the principles of sentencing

Functions

The primary job of the Council is two-fold.

  1. To provide information to the wider community about the sentencing process; and
  2. Obtain the communities views on sentencing and matters about sentencing.

Section 9 of the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992, relevantly provides that the Court must make it clear that the community acting through the court, denounces the sort of conduct in which the offender was involved.  The Court is often critisised as being out of touch with community expectation.  The Sentencing Advisory Committee is able to assist the Court.

The Court of Appeal may request input from the Council when delivering or reviewing a guideline judgement.  It is hoped that this will make sentencing law more transparent.

Membership

The council is to be an independent body comprised of up to 12 members.  Members are to be appointed by the Governor in Council on recommendation from the Attorney General.  Given the misrepresentation of Aboriginals or Torres Strait Islander Persons in the Judicial System, at least one member of the Council is to be an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.

The Bill provides a non-exhaustive list people with experience in sentencing law including:

  1. victims of crime;
  2. crime prevention;
  3. law enforcement;
  4. criminal prosecutions;
  5. criminal defence representatives;
  6. corrective services;
  7. juvenile justice
  8. justice matters relating to Domestic and Family Violence matters.

Expectation.

Provided the Bill passes through the Parliament, expectation is that the Council will be operational in the latter half of 2016.  It is proposed that terms of reference will be issued to consider “sentencing practices associated with Domestic and Family Violence Offences.”

Further Reading

To read more about sentencing law, particuarly the Penalties and Sentences (Queensland Sentencing Advisory Council) Amendment Bill  in full go to Sentencing Advisory Council Bill

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.