Schoolies week legal issues can impact your future.

Dancing, drinkingIt is that time of year again when school leavers get the chance to celebrate their graduation at the annual ‘Schoolies’ festival. Although we are hopeful that it is a week of fun, laughter and celebration we understand that there may be some schoolies that face legal issues.  Some schoolies week legal issues can have a real and significant impact on your future.

With a number of arrests already made over the first part of the week, we are here to provide advice on your rights and possible outcomes of common legal issues you may face.

Common ‘on the spot fine’ Offences

We understand that many schoolies are under 18 years of age however under Queensland Law you are still considered to be an adult and will be treated the same by the courts.

If you are under 18, albeit the temptation, it is illegal to use or make a fake ID’s. Large monetary fines will be issued on the spot and your ID will be confiscated. These include but not limited to:

  • Using a fake ID – $378.00;
  • Lending your ID to a friend – $630.00.

We all know alcohol plays the main role at schoolies and the majority of the festival are on the streets and beach. These areas are categorised as a public place by law. If you are caught drinking alcohol in a public place you will be issued with an on the spot fine of $126.00. This fine will be increased if you are under the age of 18 to $378.00. Please be wary this will include holding a drink for your friend.

We advise you to consume all alcohol within your apartments or licenced venues.

Serious Criminal Offences

On a more serious note and circumstances where you can be brought before the Court are for drug-related offences. Common offences include:

  1. Possessing a dangerous drug (eg. cannabis, MDMA, ecstasy pills, methyl amphetamine);
  2. Supplying a dangerous drug;
  3. Possession of utensils used for consuming illicit drugs (eg. Pipes, bongs, needles and grinders).

These are serious criminal offences and can range in penalties from fines to imprisonment. Engaging a solicitor who is familiar with this area of law and an experienced advocate on these Magistrates Court matters will enable you to receive a sentence far less serious than if you were to appear self-represented.

More importantly, given schoolies are only 17 and 18 years of age, the effects of a criminal conviction can be extremely detrimental. A criminal conviction may be recorded in relation to any matter before the court. The Magistrate has a discretion whether to record a conviction after hearing submissions by both the Prosecution and the Defence. It is vital to have an advocate on your side to elaborate on any mitigating factors and target the key issues to the Magistrate.

Recording a conviction can affect:

  1. Employment opportunities;
  2. Travel arrangements; and
  3. The ability to obtain various licences (blue card etc.).

Don’t let a mistake ruin your life, we are here to support you every step of the way.

Your rights

The starting point is that you have the right to remain silent regardless of whether you have been placed under arrest or not.

Remember:

  1. If the Police approach you on the street or during the beach party, you do need to provide them with your name and your address. If you do not comply with this direction you may be breaking the law;
  2. The Police must have a ‘reasonable suspicion’ that you’re breaking the law, have broken the law, or are about to break the law before placing you under arrest or detaining you for the purpose of a search. You are not required to provide your phone or passcodes unless they have a warrant;
  3. You are not required to attend the Police Station unless you are under arrest;
  4. You should never participate in a Police interview unless you have contacted your lawyer or family/friend. We advise strongly to contact your lawyer or family/friend once arrested. The Police are required to oblige to the same as this is a right under the law;
  5. If you obstruct Police in the course of their duty, this can lead to a criminal offence.

We are experienced in the above and many other criminal matters. We can provide legal advice throughout each step of the process including but not limited to:

  1. Your arrest;
  2. Attendance at the Police Station to provide an interview;
  3.  Sentencing options.

Our role is to answer any questions you have about your criminal matter and make the process less stressful, expedient and deliver the best possible outcome.

If you have been convicted of an offence whilst attending schoolies or you require a lawyer to attend a police interview, please contact Gatenby Criminal Law without delay on (07) 55800120 or send us a message online.

About the Author.

Sam RigbySam Rigby is a Criminal Lawyer at Gatenby Criminal Lawyers.  He is available to discuss any issues that might arise over the Schoolies festival.  You can contact us on 0477800880 or book an appointment at our office on (07)55800120.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice, you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

 

Welcome Return Of Drug Court To Queensland Courts

Law BooksIn acknowledging the link between addiction and the commission of criminal offences, the Queensland government has reinstated the Drug Court in Queensland.  This court recognises that rehabilitation is often the best way of achieving the objective of keeping the community safe from recidivist offenders, who might otherwise be unable to give up their drug and/or alcohol addiction.

On 24 October, the Queensland parliament passed the Penalties and Sentences (Drug and Alcohol Treatment Orders) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2017.  This bill is not only re-established the previous regime but expands it to include alcohol as a relevant drug.

In her August 10 Media Release, the Attorney General said that the bill introduces  “a new sentencing option that allows a court to place a Drug and Alcohol Treatment Order on those whose offending is directly linked to their severe drug or alcohol use, which will help put them back on the right path in life, away from re-offending in the long term.”

The primary policy objective of the legislation is to insert a new sentencing option into the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992 to respond to those offenders whose offending is linked to their severe drug or alcohol use.

The legislation follows 2016, Drug and Specialist Courts Review.  The drug court is aimed at addressing severe substance abuse.  The Review’s Final Report was tabled in the Queensland Legislative Assembly on 13 June 2017 and included 39 key recommendations.

 

Mrs D’Ath in her 24 October media release said the new Drug and Alcohol Court pilot in Brisbane should be operational in November.

Creation of a Drug and Alcohol Treatment Order

The Bill will insert a new part 8A into the Penalties and Sentences Act to provide for the establishment, imposition and management of a new sentencing order in Queensland called a Drug and Alcohol Treatment Order (treatment order).

New part 8A of the Penalties and Sentences Act will provide for the making of a treatment order.  The order is designed to facilitate the rehabilitation of offenders by providing judicial supervision combined with therapeutic treatment, to reduce the offender’s substance use.  The previous drug court demonstrated that this regime reduced the level of criminal activity associated with addiction.

Eligibility for a drug court treatment order

A treatment order may only be made for an offender if the offender has a severe substance use disorder and the disorder has contributed to the commission of an offence.

Severe substance use disorder

“Severe substance use disorder” is defined as a disorder prescribed by Regulation, or if not prescribed, as a substance use disorder estimated to be severe under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition, as published by the American Psychiatric Association in 2013.

This ensures that the legislation will be able to adapt to any developments in the science surrounding the recognition and classification of disorders associated with the use of drugs or alcohol.

Types of offences

An offender may proceed through the drug court in respect of either:

  1. a summary offence; or
  2. an indictable offence, that is dealt with summarily.

Included offences

Offences involving violence may be subject to a drug court treatment order, however, as the person will be released back into the community as part of the sentence, the court must not make a treatment order if it is satisfied that the offender would pose an unacceptable risk to the safety and welfare of community members.

Excluded offences

  1. sexual assault offences,
  2. offenders who are subject to a parole order; or
  3. offenders who are serving a term of imprisonment

Balance of treatment order

A drug court treatment order comprises of two parts:

Custodial part – A term of imprisonment of up to four years which is suspended for a designated period of up to five years;

Rehabilitation part  – A period of at least two years that requires compliance with core conditions including:

  1. not commit another offence,
  2. appear before the court as and when directed;
  3. report any change in residence;
  4. report any change in employment;
  5. report to a review team member or an authorised corrective services officer as required; and
  6. to comply with every reasonable direction given by the court, a review team member, or an authorised corrective services officer.

Consequence of non-compliance with treatment order

The court must have regard to a number of considerations, including:

  1. the extent of the offender’s general compliance,
  2. the nature and seriousness of the non-compliance; and
  3. any other consideration that would make the particular order unjust in the circumstances.

Where the court is satisfied that the offender has demonstrated non-compliance with the rehabilitation part of the treatment order the court may:

  1. impose further conditions to achieve the purpose of the treatment order;
  2. require the offender to perform community service; order the person serve a period of the suspended sentence of up to seven days; or
  3. revoke the rehabilitation part of the treatment order and order that the offender serve all or part of the suspended sentence.

Recognition of compliance with a treatment order

The court may cancel either the whole or part of a rehabilitation part of the treatment order if it considers that the offender has complied or substantially complied with the treatment program and that continuation of the rehabilitation part is not necessary to achieve the purpose of the treatment order.

The court may amend the rehabilitation part by amending the conditions of the treatment order, including amending the type or frequency of alcohol or drug testing.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice, you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

 

Opening of Southport’s specialist Domestic and Family Violence Court

Businesswoman in front of a bookcase

On 19 October 2017, the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath officially opened Southport’s permanent specialist Domestic and Family Violence Court.  The renovations reflect the caseload of Southport’s specialist DFV court which has dealt with more than 12,000 matter since the trial began in September 2015.

The renovations include:

  1. A dedicated registry counter for enquiries and filing DFV court applications;
  2. Secure entry for courtrooms
  3. Video conferencing facilities for female victims too fearful to attend court in person and witnesses.
  4. Quiet room for distressed women;
  5. Secure children’s play area,
  6. Meeting room facilities for men and their legal and support services, and
  7. Sound-proofed meeting rooms.

The $2.69 million renovation to upgrade Southport courthouse is in addition to the $69.5 million previously allocated to domestic and family violence courts in the 2017-18 State Budget.

The opening follows the appointment of two specialist Magistrates for the Southport DFV Court – Clare Kelly and Louise Shepherd.

Do you require legal advice or representation regarding a domestic violence matter? Call Gatenby Criminal Law now on (07) 5580 0120 or send us a message online.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice, you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Electronic Tracking for alleged Queensland DVO offenders

Domestic violence offenderFollowing the January 30 death of Teresa Bradshaw, there is a call for bail conditions to include the wearing of a tracking device by alleged domestic violence offenders.  Ms Bradford was killed by her estranged husband, who was on bail for DV offences at the time of her death.

The Queensland Police Minister, Mark Ryan said that he has on ‘open mind’ on the introduction of the technology.  This move has also been supported by the Queensland opposition leader, Tim Nicholls.

Electronic monitoring was first considered by Dr Ralph Schwitzgebel in 1964.  The technology has since been refined and used in American Courts since 1983. It has the ability to ensure that an alleged domestic violence offender does not:

  1. enter proscribed areas;
  2. approach particular people, such as complainants, victims; or
  3. approach co-offenders.

The complainant, can have a device which will alert authorities should the defendant approach within a pre-determined range.  The rationale is that police can be notified before actual contact occurs and thereby prevent further acts of domestic violence.

Interstate Approach to tracking alleged domestic violence offenders

In late 2016 the NSW Department of Justice trialed 60 Electronic Tracking Devices for Domestic Violence Offenders.

Victoria has had the power to order tracking devices and is said to be happy with the results.

The ACT and Northern Territory are said to be closely watching the New South Wales Trial.

Current Queensland Bail Legislation

Currently the Bail Act allows the Court to impose conditions that are necessary, having regard to:

  1. the nature of the offence;
  2. the circumstances of the defendant; and
  3. the public interest.

In Lacey v DPP [2007] QCA 413 the Queensland Court of Appeal was required to consider the issue of tracking devices in a bail application brought by Mr Lacey.  Lacey was charged with a number of offences including attempted murder, torture and deprivation of liberty.  There was some considerable delay with his matter reaching trial.  Lacey applied for bail and offered the condition that he would submit himself to electronic monitoring.  The Court of Appeal said

It is pointless and impractical to impose a condition which cannot be monitored and enforced. As neither police nor Corrective Services personnel have been equipped by government to carry out the necessary monitoring, no such condition could be attached to a bail order.”

While Queensland Courts do have the power to impose such conditions, it is clear that some form of government monitoring is required before such a scheme could be successfully implemented.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice on Domestic Violence you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Qld set to overturn Barbaro & Zirilli v The Queen [2014]

Statue of justiceBarbaro & Zirilli is a 2014 High Court Decision which effectively brought to an end the practice of Prosecutors providing the Court with an appropriate sentencing range.  Until 2014 it was usual for the prosecution to provide the Court with assistance not only as to the facts of a sentence but also with a range that the Crown considered appropriate for the offending.

The case itself involved conspiring to traffic a commercial quantity of MDMA, trafficking a commercial quantity of MDMA and attempting to possess a commercial quantity of cocaine.

The accused men, Mr Barbaro and Mr Zirilli agreed to enter pleas of guilty following discussions between their lawyers and the prosecution.  During those discussions, the prosecution expressed its view as to the range of sentences that might be imposed on each applicant. The prosecution told the applicants’ lawyers that the “sentencing range”, in Mr Barbaro’s case, was a head sentence of 32 to 37 years with a non-parole period of 24 to 28 years and, in Mr Zirilli’s case, a head sentence of 21 to 25 years with a non-parole period of 16 to 19 years.

At the sentencing hearing, Justice King, advised that she would not receive from either party submissions about sentencing range.  The prosecution, in those circumstances did not make any submission about what range of sentences could be imposed.  Mr Barbaro was sentenced to life imprisonment with a non‑parole period of 30 years.  Mr Zirilli was sentenced to 26 years’ imprisonment with a non‑parole period of 18 years.

The High Court dismissed both appeals.  The Court held, by majority, that it is neither the role nor the duty of the prosecution to proffer some statement of the bounds within which a sentence may be imposed.  It is for the sentencing judge alone to decide what sentence will be imposed. As a consequence the practice of providing the Sentencing Court with assistance as to the sentencing range came to an end.

The Queensland Government has indicated that it will introduce legislation into Parliament that will reinstate the ability of a court to receive submissions from both the prosecutor and defence on what they considered was the appropriate sentence or range of sentence that should be imposed.

The proposed legislation will return proceedings to the situation that existed prior to the High Court decision in Barbaro & Zirilli v Queen [2014] and will improve consistency in sentencing, as well as assist in the efficient running of courtrooms.

When do I have to provide police with a traffic crash report?

traffic lawsCurrent Law.

The Driver of a motor vehicle is required to furnish a traffic crash report to police as soon as possible to the nearest police station.

Section 92 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995 and section 287 of the Queensland Road Rules require drivers involved in crashes and other incidents that result in more than $2 500 damage to report those incidents to police.

Drivers must also report to police if a person is injured or killed in the crash or a motor vehicle involved in the crash needs to be towed from the scene.

Maximum penalty –

  1.  if death or injury is caused to any person – 20 penalty units or imprisonment for one year; or
  2. otherwise – 10 penalty units or six months imprisonment.

Rationale for Change.

The $2 500 threshold has been in place for many years without being increased and no longer reflects a requirement to only report more serious crashes to police. This amount does not reflect the fact that a majority of crashes now involve damage exceeding $2 500 because modern vehicles are designed to crumple to preserve passenger safety.

Proposed Law

The Transport and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2014 amends section 92 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995 to remove the requirement to report crashes to police where property damage exceeds an amount fixed by regulation (currently $2 500).

Subsequently, the same requirement will be removed from the Queensland Road Rules.

Proposed Reporting Requirements

There will be a requirement to report crashes to police where:

  1. a person is injured or killed; or
  2. if any vehicle needs to be towed from the scene.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

Police Set to Outsource Service of Notices To Appear

Notices to Appear

Notices to AppearUnder current legislation the Queensland Police Service is required to personally serve Notices to Appear on alleged offenders.  This process ensures that the alleged offender is aware that they have been charged and the date upon which they are required to appear in Court.

The changes proposed by the Police Minister are said to affect service of Notices to Appear in relation to:

  1. Failing to stop a motor vehicle on direction;
  2. Provisional drivers, driving a restricted vehicle;
  3. Exceed speed limit by more than 40kmh;
  4. Failing to stop at a red light;
  5. Public nuisance;
  6. Disorderly behaviour; and
  7. Threatening behaviour.

Service

The service of Notice to Appear by ordinary pre paid post is fraught with danger.  Currently the legislation permits service from Queensland Transport and the State Penalties Enforcement Register, by ordinary pre paid mail.  There are almost daily examples of people who have not received such notices being pulled over for unlicensed driving and facing mandatory loss of licence of up to 6 months.

Traffic infringement notices for offences detected by camera are now sent by registered mail, however under these proposed changes, offences requiring court appearances before a Magistrate will be sent by mail.

A number of these offences can result in the forfeiture of a persons motor vehicle.  A failure to appear will likely result in an arrest warrant issuing and the persons being arrested and held in custody for a traffic or street offence.

People need to be vigilant in terms of maintaining their correct residential details with government bodies and ensuring that any concerns with the delivery of their post is resolved with Australia Post.

If Postmen are to become defacto police officers, delivering Notices to Appear, then the QPS should at the very least be required to serve the Notices by way of Registered Post to ensure that service is effected.  We are extremely concerned about these changes.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

 

 

Juvenile Offenders To Be Named and Shamed Under New Laws

Imprisonment no longer a sentence of last resort for childhood offenders in Qld

Imprisonment no longer a sentence of last resort for childhood offenders in Qld

New criminal laws have been passed for juvenile offenders in Queensland with a substantial overhaul of the Qld Childrens Court process.  These changes are substantial in that they remove the requirement for a sentence of imprisonment to be a sentence of last resort and open up the children’s court for repeat offenders.  They go further in that the prohibition against reporting children’s names before, during and after proceedings has been removed for alleged repeat offenders.

Changes to Qld Childrens Court

The changes to Qld Childrens Court include:

  1. Permit repeat offenders’ identifying information to be published;
  2. Open the Childrens Court for youth justice matters involving repeat offenders;
  3. Create a new offence where a child commits a further offence while on bail;
  4. Permit childhood findings of guilt for which no conviction was recorded to be admissible in court when sentencing a person for an adult offence;
  5. Provide for the automatic transfer from detention to adult corrective services facilities of 17 year olds who have six months or more left to serve in detention;
  6. Provide that, in sentencing any adult or child for an offence punishable by imprisonment, the court must not have regard to any principle, whether under statute or at law, that a sentence of imprisonment (in the case of an adult) or detention (in the case of a child) should only be imposed as a last resort;
  7. Allow children who have absconded from Sentenced Youth Boot Camps to be arrested and brought before a court for resentencing without first being given a warning; and
  8. Make a technical amendment to the Youth Justice Act 1992.

Naming repeat offenders

The amendments limit the application of the existing prohibition on publishing identifying information about a child the subject of proceedings to first-time offenders only.

This means repeat offenders who have been found guilty of another offence will be able to be identified and reported in the media, both during and after proceedings against them.  In the past children charged with criminal offences, have been able to escape the public scrutiny of their identities being published or reported on the media.  This has been said to reflect the important principle that children make mistakes, and should be given an opportunity to learn from them.  These new changes will remove that privilege and expose repeat offenders to media exposure.

The Qld Childrens Court can make an order at any time during a proceeding prohibiting publication of a repeat offender’s identifying information where it considers this to be in the interests of justice. This power may be exercised on the court’s own discretion or on application by a specified party. 

Opening the Childrens Court

The Qld Childrens Court will remain closed when hearing matters in relation to first- time offenders.  The legislation provides that Qld Childrens Court proceedings under the Youth Justice Act 1992 which involve repeat offenders are to be held in open court.  Childrens Court proceedings are currently only required to be held in open court where a judge is exercising jurisdiction to hear and determine a charge on indictment.  The court will have the discretion to hold some or all of a proceeding in relation to a repeat offender in closed court where it considers this to be in the interests of justice.

Imprisonment no longer a sentence of last resort

The amendments remove the principle that detention or prison is a sentence of last resort from both the Youth Justice Act 1992 and the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992. 

New offence of committing an offence while on bail

There is a new offence of committing a further offence while on bail. This new offence will be taken to have been committed where a finding of guilt is made against the young person in relation to that further offence.

The maximum penalty for the new breach of bail offence will be 20 penalty units or one year’s imprisonment.  This is half the maximum penalty under section 29 of the Penalties and Sentences Act 1992 for breach of a condition of bail by an adult

Transfer to adult prisons for offenders when they turn 17 years.

The  Youth Justice Act 1992, currently provides for a court to order in certain circumstances that an offender be transferred to an adult correctional facility on turning 18 (or on turning 17 where they have previously been held in prison under a sentence or on remand). The ammendment provides that all offenders sentenced to a period of detention must be automatically transferred to an adult correctional facility on turning 17 if, at that time, they have at least 6 months left to serve in detention. If an offender is already 17 at the time of sentence to a period of detention of six months or more, that sentence will automatically be taken to be a sentence to a period of imprisonment to be served in a corrective services facility.

Retrospective effect

In a proceeding against an adult for an offence, any childhood finding of guilt for which no conviction was recorded will be admissible for the purposes of sentencing. This includes where the adult offence was committed or the proceeding against the adult started before commencement of the legislation.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

NSW to Target Repeat and High Range Drink Driving with Interlock

interlock devicesHigh Range Drink Driving

Repeat and those caught high range drink driving will have to install an alcohol interlock device under legislation to be introduced into NSW parliament early next year.

While there is a voluntary scheme currently in place, it is believed this mandatory system will prevent at least 140 alcohol related crashes.

Alcohol Interlock

An alcohol interlock will be installed in a person’s car if they have been caught drink driving twice in five years, or once with a blood-alcohol level above 0.15 (high range drink driving).

Magistrates will also have the power to make motorists keep the interlock in place for longer than the mandatory minimum term of 12 months.

Interlocks are connected to a vehicle’s ignition and prevent the car from starting if the driver has been drinking.

The proposed laws appear to mirror those currently operating in Queensland. Queensland drink drivers have discovered that there is  considerable expense in having the interlock device fitted to the vehicle and maintained during the operational period.  They have also found that Queensland Transport monitors the calibration level of the device closely.

Queensland Interlock Scheme

In Queensland there is provision to opt out of the scheme, however an additional disqualification period of two (2) years applies.  It is not known whether similar provisions will apply.

For advice on the implementation of the new laws you should contact an experienced traffic lawyer.

Disclaimer

This website contains general information about legal matters.  The information is not advice, and should not be treated as such.  You must not rely on the information on this website as an alternative to legal advice from your lawyer or other professional legal services provider.  You should never delay seeking legal advice, disregard legal advice, or commence or discontinue any legal action because of information on this website.

For specific legal advice you should immediately contact Gatenby Criminal Lawyers on (07) 5580 0120.

Liability limited by a scheme approved under professional standards legislation.

 

Increased penalties for QLD Stock Offences

stock penaltiesThe minimum fines for stock offences have increased from $200 to $1100 per animal or the value of the animal, whichever is the higher amount.

Other amendments to the legislation will benefit investigating authorities and primary producers by:

  1. Empowering police to effectively investigate stock crime by extending stock-related search warrant durations from 7 to 21 days
  2. Modernising evidentiary requirements in stock offence prosecutions
  3. Maintaining the ability of police to immediately return cattle to victims of crime where there is no dispute as to ownership
  4. Streamlining the disposal process where there is a dispute as to ownership, allowing the stock to be sold pending an order from the Court to distribute the funds at the conclusion of proceedings
  5. Under the new laws, the Court can order the return of cattle when stock has strayed onto a person’s property and the land owner refuses to move the cattle,” he said.

If you are being charged with a stock offence and require legal representation, call Gatenby Criminal Law on (07) 5580 0120 or contact us immediately.